Prepare Ye the Way

This year’s unusually short season of Advent gives us just three weeks and one day to prepare for the coming of Christ on Christmas day. CUF’s Faith Fact on Advent and Christmas traditions (found here) gives great advice on observing this liturgical season. Here are three simple ways to enter prayerfully into the season of […]

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ERP Facebook Sweepstakes

Check out the newest Emmaus Road Publishing Sweepstakes on our facebook page: Each week of Advent a lucky contestant will be drawn to receive a beautiful framed Nativity art print. Click on the “Sweepstakes” tab for more details to enter . . . and tell your friends! The first draing will be held on Monday, November […]

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Candidates and Characters

I’ve always been a sucker for surveys, tests, and questionnaires. I even enjoyed taking the Myers-Briggs personality profile way back when in seminary (I used to be an INFP, though years of hitting deadlines may have turned me into an INFJ). Anyway, I recently stumbled upon two “tests” that are at the very least interesting, and I think the […]

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“Pink Candle” Sunday

This Sunday, the third Sunday of Lent, is traditionally called Gaudete Sunday. It is “rejoicing Sunday,” as “Gaudete” is the first word of the Entrance Antiphon, taken from Philippians 4:4-5: “Rejoice in the Lord always; again I say, rejoice! The Lord is near.” Gaudete Sunday, along with Laetare Sunday in Lent (as an aside, to avoid confusion, remember Laetare and […]

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Dressed in Blue

I admit it. Most days I pay precious little attention to what I wear. As long as it’s clean and presentable–and still fits–I’m satisfied. This morning, however, I sought out my best blue dress shirt. It’s a holy day, the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception, and I thought it would be fitting to wear blue […]

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The Real St. Nick

As we prepare for the sublime feast of the Nativity of Our Lord during these weeks of Advent, we can’t help but notice the trappings of our secular culture that continually impose themselves on the “holiday season.” Meanwhile, more overtly religious expressions, such as créches or Nativity scenes, are systematically excluded from the public square. […]

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